Baby Ruth candy bars & chocolates, the way they used to be years ago

Baby Ruth candy bars Quick pickup for safety on the road (1951)

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Baby Ruth candy bars — and even Baby Ruth gum — were among the most popular sweets back in the day. Right here, take a look at more than 50 years of the history of the brand.

Old-fashioned Baby Ruth candy bars – “A favorite everywhere!” (1926)

Vintage Baby Ruth candy bars - A favorite everywhere (1926)


Baby Ruth chocolate bar… in a keepsake cedar chest (1926)

Baby Ruth chocolate bar keepsake cedar chest (1926)


Baby Ruth Gum – Real Mint flavor (1920s)

This vintage gum didn’t taste like chocolate or peanuts, but briefly capitalized on the Baby Ruth brand name! 

Baby Ruth Gum - Real Mint flavor (1920s)


Baby Ruth — rich in dextrose! Vintage ad (1930s)

Baby Ruth rich in dextrose vintage ad (1930s)

DON’T MISS: The history of Tootsie Rolls, once America’s favorite candy (and Tootsie Pops, too)


Baby Ruth candy bars for soldiers in WWII (1943)

Sweet tooth …my eye! There ain’t no pantywaists in this man’s Army! Candy’s darn good to cat, but, more important, we know it’s fine food.

“If you ever manned a machine gun or tossed around in a tank, you’d know what I mean. Yes sir . . . in battle or in barracks, soldiers crave candy!” 

The sergeant is right. Even a buck private knows that candy is a valuable part of army rations. Every man on the fighting front is issued a compact food kit containing special dextrose tablets to sustain him when the fresh ration is not obtainable.

Curtiss Candy Company is delivering millions of candy products to the Quartermaster Corps of the U.S. Army… and packaging tons of other important foods such as biscuits, bouillon powder, dehydrated mincemeat, prune and apricot powders.

In addition, we observe the priorities of War Plants in their orders for Baby Ruth, Butterfinger and other famous Curtiss Candy Bars. Obviously, there is no “business as usual” at Curtiss. Our great food plants are operating at capacity.

We are supplying millions of hard-working Americans who look to Baby Ruth and Butterfinger for food-energy and food-enjoyment. Occasionally some dealers may be out of Baby Ruth or Butterfinger. Such shortages are only temporary. Just continue to ask for your favorite Curtiss Candy Bars.

Baby Ruth candy bars for soldiers in WWII (1943)


Baby Ruth chocolate candy for a shopping lift! (1950s)

Baby Ruth chocolate candy for a shopping lift!


Curtiss Baby Ruth for Christmas

Curtiss: Makers of Butterfinger, Coconut Grove, Dip candy bars, Saf-T-Pops, Fruit Drops, Mints and Gum — See more Curtis candies: Chocolates & fruit drops (1951-1953)

Curtiss Baby Ruth for Christmas (1951)

ALSO SEE: Check out the colorful history of Life Savers candy in this fascinating timeline (plus see a list of 30+ classic flavors)


Baby Ruth candy bars: Quick pickup for safety on the road (1951)

Baby Ruth candy… rich in dextrose (food-energy sugar)

Baby Ruth candy bars Quick pickup for safety on the road (1951)


Curtiss vintage Baby Ruth nuggets candy (1955)

Curtiss vintage Baby Ruth nuggets candy (1955)


Baby Ruth nuggets and Butterfinger Chips (1950s)

Baby Ruth nuggets and Butterfinger Chips (1950s)


“A Rose and a Baby Ruth” song (1957)

A Rose and a Baby Ruth song (1957)


Retro Baby Ruth candy bars (1961)

Vintage Baby Ruth candy bars 1961-1962


Baby Ruth Big Bar and Butterfinger Big Bar (1986)

Baby Ruth Big Bar and Butterfinger Big Bar (1986)

SEE MORE: 80s candy: See 35 most excellent retro favorites, including chocolate & fruity sweets

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