Science & technology

The home of the future: Space-age inventions (1958-1961)

Imagine getting paid to envision the future -- in ways that were inventive, optimistic, fanciful, logical, silly or surreal, depending on the week? Throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s, that is exactly what commercial artist and futurist Arthur Radebaugh got to do.

Are we entering the atomic age? (1940)

For almost 2,500 years, man was wrong. From the time of Socrates, he had thought of atoms as the smallest particles of matter. In the last century, scientists discovered still tinier particles within atoms. At... Read more...

New super-locomotive train capable of 100 MPH (1937)

A 16-cylinder streamlined steam super-locomotive capable of whisking 14 standard Pullman cars along at a speed of 100 miles an hour on a level, straight track will make its appearance soon in the railroad world.

New drug found in common soil (1948)

New drug found in common soil It is the first quick cure for typhus: Chloromycetin In a bit of common soil taken from a Venezuelan field, Yale scientists have found a new and spectacularly successful weapon... Read more...

Computer sports challenge players (1978)

Computer sports challenge players Once upon a time, playing a sports game entailed opening a board that simulated the arena, throwing some dice or spinning a spinner and then looking at a chart to see what had... Read more...

Space age: Amazing retro futuristic homes of the ’60s

What did the future look like from the '60s? In this ad series for Motorola, commercial artist Charles Schridde depicted modernist homes of the future - and perfectly captured the era's sleek style and space-age optimism.

Male ‘Pill’ shows promise (1976)

It's interesting that, 40 years later, we're still seeing the same kinds of news stories about the potential of male contraceptives. For example, 2011 brought us Could a birth control pill for men be on the hor... Read more...
The Telephone & How We Use It (from 1951)

The rotary-dial telephone and how we use it (1951)

The Telephone and How We Use It was published by Bell Telephone System in 1951. Geared toward children, the booklet covers the basics of how to use a rotary-dial telephone - the latest technology of the time.

Apple introduces the Macintosh personal computer (1984)

Here's the original press release that a small California company called Apple released back in January 1984, announcing the launch of their new PC -- the first mass-market personal computer featuring both a graphical user interface and a mouse.

Phone faster by touching buttons (1965)

How you'll phone faster by touching buttons The new Touch-Tone Bell telephone, made by Western Electric, is actually an electronic musical instrument. Each button you touch causes it to produce a different c... Read more...

Maxell cassette tape ads (1980s)

Maxell was one of the leaders in the cassette tape world -- and, amazingly, the company is still making blank audio tapes. So if you still have your tape recorders from the seventies and eighties, you're set! ... Read more...

Artificial daylight made by Tesla (1899)

The promise made by Nikola Tesla to the world some two years ago that he would soon give it a means of lighting its homes, its offices and its streets at night time by “artificial daylight” has been fulfilled.

Pin It on Pinterest