Science & technology

Space age: Amazing retro futuristic homes of the ’60s

What did the future look like from the '60s? In this ad series for Motorola, commercial artist Charles Schridde depicted modernist homes of the future - and perfectly captured the era's sleek style and space-age optimism.

How the railroads first crossed America (1968)

The most dramatic and best-known story of railroading in the United States is the connecting of the Atlantic and the Pacific by railroad in 1869, tying of the oceans together by rail across the heart of the United States
Tesla holding a phosphor-coated wireless light bulb

Nikola Tesla’s plan to give free electricity to everyone (1896)

Free electricity for everyone? It means that if Nikola Tesla succeeds in harnessing the electrical earth currents and putting them to work for man there will be an end to oppressive extortionate monopolies in steam, telephones, telegraphs and the other commercial uses of electricity

The home of the future: Space-age inventions (1958-1961)

Imagine getting paid to envision the future -- in ways that were inventive, optimistic, fanciful, logical, silly or surreal, depending on the week? Throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s, that is exactly what commercial artist and futurist Arthur Radebaugh got to do.

New super-locomotive train capable of 100 MPH (1937)

A 16-cylinder streamlined steam super-locomotive capable of whisking 14 standard Pullman cars along at a speed of 100 miles an hour on a level, straight track will make its appearance soon in the railroad world.
The Telephone & How We Use It (from 1951)

The rotary-dial telephone and how we use it (1951)

The Telephone and How We Use It was published by Bell Telephone System in 1951. Geared toward children, the booklet covers the basics of how to use a rotary-dial telephone - the latest technology of the time.

Apple introduces the Macintosh personal computer (1984)

Here's the original press release that a small California company called Apple released back in January 1984, announcing the launch of their new PC -- the first mass-market personal computer featuring both a graphical user interface and a mouse.

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