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A 17-year-old, bored high school youth teams up with a zonked out inventor to fly a DeLorean car back in time. That’s the original, charming concept of Back to the Future, the latest pleasantry on the summer fantasy trail.
It would seem like Bruce Lee was born for stardom, and unfortunately, like many of the brightest burning stars, he was gone far too soon.
Any movie that includes a gigantic pie-throwing scene featuring 40 swishing dancers, Tarzan, Cheetah and Adolf Hitler can’t really be called ordinary. Particularly when it’s a western, set in 1874.
While the "finale" in the original article title refers to the fact that this was Clark Gable's last movie -- he died just 12 days after filming of The Misfits ended -- looking back, we can see that the phrasing was oddly (and sadly) prescient: Time would eventually reveal that this was Marilyn Monroe's final film role, too.
Hollywood has found Rock Hudson. And Rock Hudson will play every conceivable role possible, until either he objects, or the box office begins to slump.
Tim’s performance in Ordinary People, his first theatrical film, for which he won an Oscar this past April. His role of Conrad Jarrett, the suicidal son, so deeply touched a nerve in America’s youth that Tim has, in turn, become something of a symbol of Vulnerability and Tenderness for wounded teenage psyches.
Harold Lloyd Safety Last hanging from the clock
This skepticism toward the genuineness of motion-picture 'stunts' finds its origin partly in the early pictures, where daring deeds were performed by a so-called extra, who doubled for the star for a mere pittance of five dollars a day.
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