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Traditional sauces and sides to serve with meats (1899)

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Braised lamb shank with roasted vegetables puree
This article was apparently prepared a few months ahead of time… unless it was truly ghostwritten.

French-born Chef Charles Ranhofer died in New York on October 9, 1899 at age 62. He was famous for having created several well-known dishes, such as Lobster Newberg, as well as for popularizing Baked Alaska.

This goes with that: What sauces and sides to serve with meats

by C Ranhofer, chef of Delmonico’s, New York

There seems to be an unwritten law that certain things belong together and are expected to be served together. That this meat and that vegetable, or this sauce with that kind of fish, and so on down the list.

Meat is the foundation of a dinner, and vegetables, sauces, jellies, preserves and relishes the different stones which help to make the whole complete.

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Traditional sauces and sides to serve with meats (1899) - Photo by Sebastian_Studio/Envato


With roast beef: Spiced fruit, cranberry sauce, spinach, cauliflower or daintily cooked cabbage.

With roast mutton: Currant jelly, rice, caper sauce, gravy.

With broiled mutton chops: Rice, tomato sauce, peas.

With broiled mutton: Caper sauce, boiled rice, stewed turnips, currant jelly.

With roast lamb: Mint sauce, rice, peas.

With boiled beef: Turnips, carrots, currant jelly, mustard.

With broiled beefsteak: Maitre d’hotel butter, peas and any jelly or preserve.

With roast veal: Mushroom sauce, baked tomatoes, creamed onions, rice croquettes.

With roast pork: Applesauce, beans, turnips.

With fried chicken: Cream gravy, tartar sauce, peas, currants.

With boiled fowls: Cranberry sauce, apple or currant jelly, peas.

With roast turkey: Cranberry sauce, currant jelly, rice and stewed celery.

With roast goose: Applesauce, cranberry sauce, browned turnips and some kind of jelly.

With roast duck: Apple jelly, cranberry jelly, celery, turnips.

With roast venison and wild duck: Sour grape jelly, currant jelly, browned turnips.

With roast wild goose: Mushroom sauce, celery, applesauce, macaroni.

With roast grouse: Apple or currant jelly, rice, peas.

With brown stews: Dumplings, stewed carrots, jelly.

With deviled oysters, creamed fish or clams served en coquille: Serve with cucumber sauce and bread.

With baked fish: Drawn butter, Hollandaise sauce, spiced grapes, cucumbers.

With broiled fish: Tartar sauce, tomato sauce, maitre d’hotel butter, stewed cucumbers.

With fried fish: Tomato sauce, spiced currants, lemon, cucumbers.

With boiled fish: Tomato sauce, tartar sauce, plain butter, sauce piquante.

With fish croquettes: Hollandaise sauce, potato balls.

With broiled mackerel: Cornmeal mush fried.

With beef’s heart: String beans, currant jelly, parsnip fritters.

With smelts: Sauce tartare.

With jugged rabbit: Onions, carrots, stuffed potatoes, tomatoes.

With panned chicken: Cream mushroom sauce, muffins or waffles.

With kidney: Bacon, either broiled or fried, is served.

With cold meat: Spiced fruit, soy, jellies, catsups, salads.

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