See 1970s Chevrolet Caprice Classic coupes & sedans

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1970s Chevrolet Caprice Classic coupes and sedan

Note: This article may feature affiliate links to Amazon or other companies, and purchases made via these links may earn us a small commission at no additional cost to you. Find out more here.

Take a look back at these 1970s Chevrolet Caprice Classic cars, which came in both coupe and sedan models, and with new body styles that reflected driver preferences — and that offered better mileage.

Introducing the 1974 Caprice Classic: And it’s so much better with ’74 Chevrolet

Introducing the Caprice Classic, for people who think driving is something the car should do.

Here is luxury and comfort asking to be enjoyed. Outside: a distinctive new roof line, on the Coupe, and an imposing new grille. Inside: peace, quiet, and convenience.

Power steering, power front disc brakes, and Turbo Hydra-matic transmission are standard. Why look any higher?

Introducing 1974 Caprice Classic


Now that’s more like it. The new 1977 Caprice Classic sedan

A whole new car, a whole new ball game.

  • More mileage
  • More efficient
  • More head room
  • More rear leg room
  • More trunk room
  • More manageable in city traffic
  • More beauty

1977 Caprice Classic Sedan (1)

1977 Caprice Classic Sedan (2)


The New ’78 Chevrolet Caprice. Now that’s more like it.

Compared to the 1976 full-size Chevys it replaced, The New Chevrolet Caprice has more head room, more rear-seat leg room (see photo at right), more trunk room, more ease of entry and exit, more manageability in city traffic and parking, more corrosion fighters and more fuel economy.

It is also more beautiful. Trim, crisp, in tune with the times. (Shown: ’78 Caprice Classic Coupe)

Is it any wonder, therefore, that more people have been buying more Chevrolet Caprices and Impalas than any other car? (The New Chevrolet is equipped with GM-built engines produced by various divisions. See your dealer for details. )

ALSO SEE: ’70s Chevy Nova cars: Hatchbacks, police cars & more classic compact Chevrolets

1978 Chevrolet Caprice Coupe


’78 Red Chevy Caprice Classic Sedans

The New Chevrolet Caprice: Last year we introduced The New Chevrolet, a whole new kind of six-passenger car. And like hot dogs and apple pie, America is eating it up.

Now in its second year, The New Chevrolet, compared to the full-size ’76 Chevrolet, continues to give you more:

More miles per gallon. 24 mpg highway, 17 mpg city — EPA estimates with standard 250 Cu. In. L6 engine and automatic transmission.

In California, EPA estimates are lower. (Your mileage depends on how you drive, your car’s condition, where you drive, and your car’s available equipment. Also, The New Chevrolet is equipped with GM-built engines produced by various divisions. See your dealer for details.)

More manageability in city traffic. Reduced overhang, front and rear, plus a shortened turning diameter, make the car noticeably more nimble where space is limited. Parking is easier, too.

MORE: Take a look back at the classic ’70s Chevy Impalas

1978 Red Chevy Caprice Classic Sedan (2)

1978 Red Chevy Caprice Classic Sedan (1)


1979 Caprice Sedan in Silver Classic Custom Two-Tone.

You’ve heard of the rocky road to success. Well, that old cliché sure doesn’t fit The New Chevrolet. The ride to the top was swift and sure. It was also smooth and quiet.

A winner on the charts. Within weeks of its introduction, in the autumn of 1976, our new generation full-size car became the best-selling car in America. And its been solidly on top ever since.

“Must be some car,” you say. “You’re so right,” we say. A winner on the road. Owners are giving The New Chevrolet particularly high marks in ease of handling and riding comfort.

Take a ride in one and see. Feel how Full Coil suspension helps flatten out the bumps. And how 16 strategically located rubber body

mounts help muffle road noise and vibration. Let your body bask in the comfort and quiet of The New Chevrolet. Then talk to your Chevrolet dealer about buying or leasing a 1979 Caprice or Impala for your very own. America has driven it to the top.

MORE: Look back at the Chevrolet Vega, the subcompact car Chevy produced from 1970 to 1977

1979 Chevrolet Caprice Sedan


1977 Chevrolet Caprice Classic Sedan

With reviews like these, its no wonder The New Chevrolet is a hit.

“The Car of the Year” – Motor Trend

“The styling may be the best out of GM in years. Appearance alone could sell the car.” – Chicago Tribune.

“Reduced spring rates and modified suspension geometry allow the car to retain its plush ‘big-car’ ride.” – Popular Science.

“And it’s built…with a genuine concern for the driver!! Car and Driver. “They’ve taken a big step in the right direction with the new Caprice.” – Road Test

“…a sedan an enthusiast can enjoy and at the same time recommend to his non-enthusiast neighbor for an entirely different set of reasons.” – Motor Trend

“…this was a car that each member of the staff, even the most dedicated sports car enthusiasts, wanted to drive at every opportunity.” – Motor Trend

“… headroom, shoulder room and just about every other kind of room is perfectlysatisfactory for a trip of any length.” – Road Test

“You’ll love it.” – Chattanooga News Free Press

1977 Chevrolet Caprice Classic Sedan car

NOW SEE THIS: See 17 different vintage Chevrolet station wagons from the ’70s, including Chevelle, Caprice, Vega & others

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Comments on this story

One Response

  1. My parents bought a brand new metallic mint green Caprice Classic station wagon (with the front, the back, and the back-back seats) when I was three and it lasted my family from the time I was in preschool through my graduation from junior college. It had an V8 engine, an 8-track player (which was on the way out even then…Lol!), and it could turn on a dime. The odometer died after the first six months, but everything else just kept on going and going and going. Considering how many times we drove it the length of California over two decades, I can only imagine what the total mileage on it was. It was the car on which I learned to drive, and my friends called it ‘The Pickle’ and ‘The Battle Wagon’ (it acquired the latter name after we were run into by a drunk driver who didn’t turn react when the road curved and the drunk’s vehicle bounced off of the side of ours. The drunk’s car was pretty mashed in. Ours, though, we had to actually physically feel the side of it to determine that there was a dent, because it was so small that it wasn’t really visible. I would have one again today if only they’d make them.

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