New Cadillac design announced (1913)

Jan 7, 2017 by

The Cadillac innovation mentioned herein was a two-speed rear axle, combined with a door-mounted, electrically-operated shifter which allowed the driver to change the rear axle ratios from low to high, thereby quickly and easily improving fuel economy. – AJW

New Cadillac design announced by agency

1914 car will be new quality of luxury and acme of perfection

While the first announcement of the 1914 Cadillac does not give any details of the car, it promises a new element of efficiency, a new quality of luxury and a new source of economy. The recent season was brought to a close last week by the delivery of the last of a 1,000 Cadillac car order. This sets a new mark for California.

Eleven years ago, the Cadillac company produced the first practical and durable motor car in large numbers. How practical it was the world knows, as those 11-year-old Cadillacs are still in service.

Five years ago, the company, by massed production, scientific standardization and advanced manufacturing methods demonstrated that is was possible to build such a high grade car for less than $2,000.

Two years ago, the Cadillac company made possible a realization of the motorist’s dream by being the first to introduce an electric cranking and lighting system which banished to oblivion the awkward crank and inefficient illumination.

The fourth step is heralded as another important step in the progress of the modern motor car. Just what this important step is has been held back for the second announcement that will give all the specifications and details.


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1 Comment

  1. Sear

    That Is and awesome Cadillac, wish i had once to go over and make people jealous

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