Vintage home style: Vinyl floor tiles in square patterns from the 1950s

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Vintage Bird Duo-tone flooring from 1951

Bathroom floor brilliantly inspired by abstract art (1958)

Brilliantly inspired by abstract art — this refreshing bathroom floor is “Terrazzo Chip”. . . latest and loveliest Kentile Solid Vinyl Tile. It’s resilient . . . greaseproof and waterproof . . . a dream to clean . . . and wears and wears. Remember, too, such glowing colors and fashion designs are found only in Kentile Floors.

Colors: Dark Granite, Tennessee and Dark Tennessee with black feature strip

Vinyl flloring from 1958 in a bathroom with a sunken tub


Square brown bathroom tiles (1957)

No problem about getting the children to take their baths in this bathroom, with its gay colorful Armstrong Floor.

No need to scold them for splashing either. Water won’t leave a trace on the handsome floor — it mops dry in a few seconds. And look what a few simple insets do to give this linoleum floor a rich custom look.

Floor is Armstrong Spatter Linoleum, Style 5005 with insets of Plain Brown 20.

Square retro style bathroom flooring from the 1950s


The loveliest floor is easiest to clean (1956)

Capri blue and white tweed color flooring with feature strip. Brown Kencove wall base. Capri Blue KenFlor on countertops.

Jul 23, 1956 retro kitchen with yellow and blue vinyl floor tile kenroyal


Plaid-style vinyl flooring for a family room and kitchen from the ’50s

Bold patterned retro floors from the fifties (3)

ALSO SEE  17 striped & checkerboard-patterned floors from 1950s homes

Retro KenFlex family room floor in blue & green checkerboard pattern

Retro patterned floors in blue and green from 1953


Bird Duotone linoleum tile patterns from 1951

This brand-new linoleum tile is the cleverest floor covering idea in years. Its patented cut-out feature makes it possible to lay a floor in a pattern of your own design!

Tiles may be used as they come— in plain color — or with centers removed and fitted snugly into tiles of another color. In this way, innumerable combinations of colors and patterns can be used to follow any design you wish. Your completed floor will look like an expensive “custom-cut” tile.

Best of all, Bird Duotone Tile is so easy to lay, anyone can do it. Just follow the simple directions in the booklet furnished. You’ll have a strikingly “different” floor that’s extremely attractive and easy to keep polished and clean.

Vintage Bird Duo-tone flooring from 1951


Vintage 1950s Bird Armorlite vinyl kitchen flooring with squares

Vintage 1950s Bird Armorlite vinyl kitchen flooring with squares


Brown squares with beige insets for a casual modern living room

Vintage 50s flooring in square patterns (1)


’50s sitting room floor with squares within squares

Vintage 50s flooring in square patterns (2)


Playroom with Carnival asphalt Kentile in blue & yellow

Gay Carnival asphalt tile, used alone or mixed with other styles, invites the creation of exciting, distinctive floors.

Carnival is the gayest of the Kentile asphalt tile styles. Here’s lasting charm, plus the easy-to-keep-clean practicality that every homemaker wants. Soil and footprints scarcely show on this refreshing color-flecked floor.

By itself, or in harmony with other asphalt tile styles. Carnival offers many, many opportunities to express your own originality. For instance, Carnival mixed with Marbleized Kentile asphalt tile combine to make-up the beautiful playroom floor below.

Huge floor patterns - Retro home decor from the 50s (2)

ALSO SEE  100+ fabulous '50s floors of linoleum & vinyl

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2 Responses

  1. I am doing a thesis on the use of vinyl flooring in the after-war period. I wanted to use some of these images for my research but my professor doesn’t want me to use the images from your website because they are without references. But I truly find your collection absolutely amazing to illustrate my work. So I would like to know if I could have access to exact references for these images such as: from where are they? Which Journals? Which page…?

    Best regards, Louis Tardivon.

    1. Hi! If you could give me guidelines as to what you’re looking for, I will see if I can send you a few with the original publication details. :-)

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