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Like old-fashioned fonts: Alphabet typefaces are ever-changing (1913)

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Old-fashioned fonts Alphabet typefaces are ever-changing (2)
In the days before we had a million and one different fonts from which to choose, the artistry of type — especially when hand-painted on to signs — was apparently still a new phenomenon.

Old-fashioned fonts Alphabet typefaces are ever-changing (2)

Alphabet is ever-changing

Painters cause certain letters to assume new shapes, cultivating the artistic side of the trade.

Alphabets are suffering a change of form at the hands of modern sign painters, remarks the Philadelphia Record.

For many years, letters have held certain distinct forms, which gave them their names and classes. Sign painters, however, are cultivating the artistic side of their trade, and from various signs displayed all over the city there seems to be a great unanimity of opinion among them as to the appearance of certain letters in one of the alphabets.

This now idea seems to be a tendency to fill in and “balance” blank spaces. It was first to be observed on the letter “L.” The painter saw fit to add a frill about the middle of the space between the base and the upright. Next the letter “O” of the series was attacked, and the ornamentation went in the middle, making the familiar letter resemble an old Greek “theta.” “A” and “V” and “Q” have been the latest to be touched up.

If the idea spreads much further, the entire alphabet will change its face.

Old-fashioned fonts Alphabet typefaces are ever-changing (1)

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