Titanic’s dead, 1,342, including Captain and all officers except four — 868 survive

Olympic’s captain ends hope that other liners than Carpathia aided in work of rescue — anxious crowds hear names of a third of the living

J J Astor, Isidor Straus and B Guggenheim among missing

Two cruisers on way to meet the Carpathia, and cable steamer will search for bodies — Sable Island in touch with her — Is electrical storm’s path

CAPE RACE, N F. APRIL 16 — A WIRELESS MESSAGE TONIGHT FROM CAPTAIN HADDOCK OF THE STEAMSHIP OLYMPIC, RELAYED BY THE CELTIC, READS AS FOLLOWS:

“PLEASE ALLAY RUMORS THAT THE VIRGINIAN HAS ANY OF TITANIC’S PASSENGERS. NEITHER HAS THE TUNISIAN. I BELIEVE THAT THE ONLY SURVIVORS ARE ON THE CARPATHIA. THE SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH AND FIFTH OFFICERS AND THE SECOND MARCONI OPERATOR ARE THE ONLY OFFICERS REPORTED SAVED.”

The second, third, fourth and fifth officers of the liner, who are among the survivors, according to the latest reports from the Carpathia undoubtedly came away from the sinking vessel in command of lifeboats.

It was announced at the White Star offices early this morning that the Carpathia was in the path of an electrical storm and that no further messages were expected for some time.

The White Star Line has arranged for the cable steamer Mackay Bennett to go from Halifax to the scene of the wreck and remain there until further orders to search for bodies of any of the passengers who lost their lives when the Titanic sank. The Mackay Bennett is now under way. It is understood that other steamers will be chartered to aid her in the search.

The last faint hope that had lingered in the hearts of many that more than the 868 survivors of the wreck of the Titanic carried by the Carpathia had been saved by some of the other vessels that hastened to answer the great White Star liner’s call of distress was dispelled shortly after 8 o’clock last night by a message from the Allan Line in Montreal.

Neither the Parisian nor the Virginian, of the Allan Line, succeeded in rescuing any of the Titanic’s passengers, said George Hannah, general passenger agent of the Allan Line, in this message. It is believed, he continued, that the Titanic sank more rapidly than had been expected, and that the work of loading the boats and getting the passengers over the side had not been completed when the final plunge occurred.

Hope that some of the passengers not aboard the Carpathia may have been saved was revived early to-day. when the captain of the freighter Ultonia, of the Phoenix Line, which arrived last night, reported that he passed along the route taken by the Titanic and that a number of fishing boats were in the vicinity at the time of the disaster. The captain said the fishing boats were headed toward Halifax.

The Carpathia has accommodations for 375 saloon and second cabin passengers and 2,300 steerage passengers and carries a crew of 300. She sailed from here with 150 saloon passengers, 40 in the second cabin and 600 in the steerage. With her crew, she thus carried 1,090 persons from this port. The addition of the 868 survivors from the Titanic would make 1,958 aboard her and would in no way strain her capacity.

The last authentic word from the Carpathia came yesterday morning in a wireless dispatch sent twenty-four hours earlier and delayed in some way unaccountable to the officers of the Cunard Company to this city. The message said:

“7:55 am New York, Lat. 41:45 N., Lon. 50:20 W. Am proceeding New York unless otherwise ordered with about 800. After having consulted with Mr Ismay and considering the circumstances, with so much ice about, consider New York best. Large number icebergs and twenty miles field ice with bergs amongst.”

This dispatch was sent by Captain A. H. Rostron of the Carpathia, and was followed an hour later by another from Captain Rostron, evidently sent earlier. This message said;

“Titanic struck iceberg. Sunk Monday, 3 am, 41:46 N., 50:14 W”

 

From The Brooklyn Daily Eagle front page – April 15, 1912

TITANIC PASSENGERS SAFE ON CARPATHIA; DAMAGED STEAMSHIP REPORTED SINKING

 

From The New York Times front page – April 15, 1912

NEW LINER TITANIC HITS AN ICEBERG; SINKING BY THE BOW AT MIDNIGHT; WOMEN PUT OFF IN LIFE  BOATS; LAST WIRELESS AT 12:27 AM BLURRED

 

The New York Times front page – April 16, 1912

TITANIC SINKS FOUR HOURS AFTER HITTING ICEBERG; 866 RESCUED SAFE BY CARPATHIA, PROBABLY 1250 PERISH; ISMAY SAFE, MRS. ASTOR MAYBE, NOTED NAMES MISSING

 

The New York Tribune front page – April 17, 1912

Titanic’s dead, 1,342, including Captain and all officers except four — 868 survive


About this story

Source publication: New York Tribune (New York, NY)

Source publication date: 17 April 1912

Notes: Top photo: At White Star office after the Titanic disaster

Filed under: 1910s, Historic events, Newspapers, The Titanic

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