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Big rings: The super-sized jewelry trend from the ’50s

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The big ring trend from the 50s

Big rings: New whoppers have more punch than price (1952)

Article from LIFE – April 21, 1952

In jewelry, intrinsic value does not always coincide with fashion. The display value of a good but diminutive half-carat diamond, which costs about $350, fades beside the eye-popping rings shown [below], the most expensive of which costs $300.

The four on the top hand are massive gold set with semiprecious stones. Styles like these are increasingly sold as engagement rings for girls who want a big show for the money.

The rings on the lower hand are set with fake stones or inexpensive real ones like tourmalines. They have little sentimental or trade-in value, but are a colorful accessory for pale summer clothes.

1952 big rings jewelry

Outsize assortment (left to right) on top hand are: sweetwater pearl with brown diamond (Arthur King, $225), turquoise with white sapphires ($300) and culture pearl ($250, both David Webb), amethysts (Otto Grun, $300). Lower hand has twin pearl dangles (Castlecliff, $10 each), real tourmalines and fake pearls (Marvella, $10), coral ball (Ciner, $25), trio of stone rings (Castlecliff, $5 each).

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Big jewelry from the 1950s

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