Early American-style furniture was right at home in this informal country living room

Early American-style furniture informal country living room
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If you like the look of country informality, you can have it by using bold colors as a foil for reproductions of Early American furniture.

In this homey informal country living room from the 1940s, the horizontal V-jointed board walls were painted a shiny porcelain white, the ceiling was flat white, and the old-fashioned confetti splatterdash floor had a white base.

Coral-reds, greens, chartreuses and blues formed the pattern of the white cretonne used for the sofa, armchair and Dutch curtains.

Green predominated in the multi-colored oval rug, and again in the textured fabric covering the wing chair.

The rounded hearth had two layers: the lower was white, and the upper was brick painted black to match the fireplace inset. The simple mantel was white marble.

The Provincial furniture, accurate reproductions of Early American pieces, had a honey-colored patina that belied its newness. The Welsh dresser was adapted from an antique in the Metropolitan Museum.

At the window was a reproduction of a fine old Pennsylvania dough box now used as a table.

Above the fireplace hangs a contemporary American primitive, “Winter Scene,” by Anna Mary Robertson Moses, known as “Grandma Moses.”

Early American-style furniture informal country living room
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