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Million dollar babies: The children of the very rich (1915)

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Million dollar babies The children of the very rich (1915)

Million dollar babies The children of the very rich (1915)

Millionaire mothers spend oceans of dollars in bringing up their babies

How will the richest babies in the land turn out?

The mothers of Baby Astor, Vincent McLean and little Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt are giving their “million dollar babies” everything that the world can give them so far as physical strength, mentality, money and material comfort are concerned — with the hope that they will grow up to be great men.

The greatest care is given to their diet, the various apartments they occupy and they have different nurseries in which to play.

Vincent McLean, who will some day inherit $100,000,000, is never alone. He has three companions, two detectives and a little negro boy to play with and keep him from being lonesome. Since his birth, Vincent’s parents have been afraid that someone would kidnap him. Four men are employed to guard the grounds that no one may enter who looks suspicious.

It costs $32,000 a year to keep the Astor baby comfortable, buy his clothing, toys, fees for doctors and lawyers, etc. Little John Jacob Astor’s fortune will amount to more than $10,000,000 when he becomes of age.

Baby Alfred Vanderbilt, by the death of his father, will share the great fortune of between $50,000,000 and $70,000,000. He has a private doctor — two or three nurses and a companion, and a bodyguard of armed detectives.

The children of the very rich (1915)

Top photo, clockwise from upper left: Vincent McLean, the Vanderbilt children, John Jacob Astor, Astor, McLean. Below: Vincent McLean on a horse, and with a dog.

HORSE SHOWS. BABY VINCENT McLEAN ON 'INDIAN FLOWER'

Vincent McLean, full-length portrait, standing, facing left, with dog 1914

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