by Vernon Scott

Lynda Carter, television’s wonderful “Wonder Woman,” displays more epidermis every week than any other actress on the tube.

Perhaps it should go without saying, but for the record, Lynda’s epidermis covers a quantity of salubrious scenery. Few if any leading ladies in a series are more felicitously endowed. In the succinct words of the hard-hat crowd, Lynda has a great build.

Neither the Bionic Woman nor Charlie’s three beautiful angels romp around in anything even approaching the brevity of Lynda’s costume. Even beauty contestants are demure by comparison, parading only briefly in swimsuits.

Not that Lynda’s wardrobe is limited to snug briefs and bosom hugging top. She also wears the uniform of the US Navy in the show.

As naval yeoman Diana Prince, she sports spectacles and a shapely WAVE uniform until it’s time to go into her feminine version of the old Clark Kent-Superman act. At strategic moments, she transforms herself from mousy sailor to fantastic Wonder Woman.

Once the switch takes place, Lynda cavorts around accomplishing superhuman feats of strength in her abbreviated rompers. Lynda’s wardrobe isn’t to be compared with a string bikini. Neither is it a two-piece number, more’s the pity. Still, it’s as revealing as television’s code allows.

Not even the blue noses can object to Miss Carter’s costume. She is saved by the simple expedient of patriotism.

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Wonder Woman’s threads are red, white and blue. She looks for all the world like an animated, sexy if you will, American flag. There are red and white stripes on her cape; white stars on a blue field cover her bottom.

>> Also see: What advice would Adam West give to Lynda Carter? (1977)

Masculine viewers are town between saluting and salivating. Some may even do both.

George Washington would have been proud; Betsy Ross, ecstatic.

It would be an entirely different matter if Lynda’s outfit were gold or silver lame. The censors would shoot her down in flames if she were adorned in sequins or, heaven forbid, tassels.

But strike our nation’s colors! Only a Communist would dare.

“Woman Woman” generally is conceded to be a children’s show. But the ratings indicate many a patriotic daddy sacrifices his leisure hours sitting in front of the tube with his toddlers.

Lynda is aware that she displays more of her charms than other television leading ladies. She is grateful she doesn’t catch cold easily. The blue-eyed beauty has learned, however, that she must watch her diet with more vigilance than other actresses.

“We’ve done 14 episodes of the show now,” Lynda said the other day. “And I have to stay fit and trim all the time. There’s no place to hide five extra pounds if I gain weight. So I have to watch what I eat. I swim 60 laps a day whenever I can. And I get plenty of exercise doing stunts on the show.

“I do as many of the physical things as I can, especially on the trampoline. But the producers prefer to use stunt people. The show would be over if anything happened to me. I’ve had a few cuts, strains and bruises but nothing serious.”

Lynda is a strikingly beautiful former Miss World-USA, circa 1973, who was born and reared in Phoenix, Arizona.

Still in her 20s, Lynda is the youngest female to star in her own show this season. She’s unmarried but doesn’t plan to stay single much longer.

“I’ve fallen in love for the first time in my life,” she said. “The man in my life is Ron Samuels. He’s Lindsay Wagner’s personal manager. Lindsay plays the title role in ‘Bionic Woman.’



“Lindsay and I are friends. We’re in the same sort of show, but there’s no sense of competition between us.

Maybe that’s because Lindsay wears dresses, suits, skirts and blouses, blue jeans and stuff like that. The poor dear doesn’t own a single red, white and blue outfit, nor is her rump ever spangled with stars.

No one, so far as is known, has caught the Bionic Woman in the sort of outfit Wonder Woman wears. But then Bionic Woman is a counter-espionage agent and might be conspicuous running around in American Legion bunting.

But it’s okay for Lynda because her show is strictly for kids. Right, dad?


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About this story

Source publication: The Town Talk (Alexandria, Louisiana)

Source publication date: February 25, 1977

Filed under: 1970s, Entertainment, Notable people, Television shows

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