Vintage Girl Scouts uniforms, badges, activities and more from the 1920s troop handbook

Girl Scouts. Troop #1. Mrs. Juliette Low, Founder, Right; Elenore Putsske, Center; Evaline Glance, 2nd From Right
Girl Scouts. Troop #1. Mrs. Juliette Low, Founder, Right; Elenore Putsske, Center; Evaline Glance, 2nd From Right

National Girl Scout organization is formed (1913)

Young girls learn signs, passwords, salutes just as boys

These are Girl Scouts:

  • They have signs and passwords and salutes just as Boy Scouts do!
  • They wigwag like soldiers in the field!
  • They signal each other with blankets and sticks!
  • They are taught integrity and honesty; kindness to animals and old people.
  • They are given instruction in cooking, sewing, washing and ironing.
  • Each girl is urged to take an active interest in all athletic games.
  • First aids to the injured are a part of the regular instruction to all!
Girl Scouts. Troop #1. Mrs. Juliette Low, Founder, Right; Elenore Putsske, Center; Evaline Glance, 2nd From Right
Girl Scouts in 1917: Troop #1. Mrs. Juliette Low, Founder, Right; Elenore Putsske, Center; Evaline Glance, 2nd From Right
Why not have a scouting organization for girls?

Why not have a national Girl Scout organization patterned very much after the Boy Scout organization which has proved so popular? This was the question, long in the mind of Mrs William Low of Savannah, Georgia, which has just resulted in the actual creation of such an organization.

The national headquarters has been opened in the Munsey building in Washington and a secretary placed in charge.

The idea started, you know, with just a little handful of girls down in Savannah. It has steadily grown. Women have written from all parts of the United States, asking for Information about the Savannah Girl Scout organization. And now Mrs Low has planned it so that all girls in the whole country may join.

The rules of the Girl Scouts are similar, in so far as it is possible, to the Boy Scouts.

The requirements for membership are exceedingly simple. Any girl is eligible who agrees to obey the rules of the organization. No unreasonable restraint is placed on them. The patrols meet once a week, spending one hour indoors, learning useful crafts and domestic duties; the other hour outdoors learning to conserve health and care for their bodies.

The handbook of the Girl Scouts is now ready for distribution. So are the badges. The uniform of the girls is blue!

Any group of girls, anywhere, may join the national organization of the Girl Scouts. The secretary at the Munsey building, Washington, is ready to tell them how.


Vintage Girl Scout uniforms (from the 1920s)

Girl Scout uniforms in the 1920s


Vintage Girl Scouts officers and class insignia

Vintage Girl Scouts from the 1920s (2)


Flower crests for troops

Vintage Girl Scouts from the 1920s (5)


Golden eaglet symbol

Vintage Girl Scouts from the 1920s (4)


Girl Scouts flag raising at dawn

Vintage Girl Scouts from the 1920s (6)


Setting-up exercise/Calisthenics

Vintage Girl Scouts from the 1920s (1)


How to rescue a drowning person

Vintage Girl Scouts from the 1920s (7)


“Afoot and light-hearted”

Vintage Girl Scouts from the 1920s (3)

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