Vintage plus-size fashion advice for the full-figured woman of 1914

Vintage plus-size fashion advice (1914)

Woman with fashionable hat

Fashions for plump women – New style models may be easily adopted by those envying slimmer sisters

“The slim woman has everything her own way in fashions,” exclaimed an exasperated matron to whom the appellation “fair, fat and forty” could be aptly applied.

While it is true that the present fashions of tiered and ruffled skirts, bouffant upper draperies and bustles are all favorable to the woman of slight figure, the over-developed form is by no means overlooked. Styles are not so set but that they may be modified.

The woman with the naturally large waist and hips, while possessing the desirable figure lines, has no inclination to accentuate these, so for her, there are the extension draperies that start considerably below the waistline.

Yokes and panniers

Yokes are having a revival this spring, and these are especially adaptable to the woman of a medium figure. These tunic yokes have flounces arranged at their lower edge, which is several inches below the waistline. The tiered skirt can be worn if the tiers are arranged on yokes, and the slight fullness of the first comes well down over the hips.

Just so, if this woman desires to adopt panniers she can do so with the aid of the yoke, and by having this pointed both in front and back even more effectual results in reducing are obtained. The panniers should be drooped so their fulness comes well below the hips. Panniers can be worn without a yoke if they are made to taper from the front to the center back.

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But it is the stout woman who has her troubles — or thinks she has, for there really are many of the new models which, if not especially designed for her, are, however, just what she should adopt. There are, for instance, the front and back panel effects which are particularly advantageous in producing long lines. If she wants draperies she can, with good effect, have tapering draperies attached to the panels at the sides, or she can wear the modified varieties arranged at the sides of the skirt.

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The stout woman can even indulge in flounces if she has them arranged up the sides of the skirt, retaining the essential long line effect by having the front and back of the skirt plain from waist to hem. The fashionable tiered skirt can be worn if the flounces are applied in tapering effects. The cutaway tunic, which is a prominent feature of the coming season’s styles, is preeminently suited to the stout woman.

Choosing colors

Figure lines are largely influenced by the material of the garment worn, especially the colorings. And in this, too, fashion favors all classes, as there never has been a time when colors were more varied than the are now.

While the woman with the youthful contour can select at will from the tango yellow, absinthe, Bermuda, gold, nattier blue, minaret and other high shades, the less fortunate woman must eschew many of those striking colors that accentuate figure lines and content herself with less glaring effects in coloring, and if her figure is a matter of self-consciousness that borders on discomfort, as is often the case, she still has a large assortment of beautiful dark and unobtrusive tones to select from in this season’s offerings.

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Vintage plus-size fashion advice (1914)

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