Decorate your own fan (1909)

Pretty fans

A fan is a dainty trifle, and should be in harmony with the gown. A fan is carried more for its picturesque beauty than for actual use, therefore the materials should be of the most fairylike delicacy. A fan is always held so near that exquisiteness of detail in the decoration is essential. In the inexpensive bought fans, there is naturally an utter lack of this fine attention to the detail of both design and workmanship that distinguish the expensive fans. The design should delicately follow or be entirely in keeping with the rounded outline of the fan.

It is possible to have a very choice fan for a small cost if one does the decoration at home. When buying the fan give the whole attention to the quality of the frame while the spread of the fan is of plain white chiffon. If a cheap lace edges it, this may bo removed.

Four designs for fans are shown in the sketch, the modes of decoration being quite within the power of the most inexperienced of craftsmen. The fan in the upper left hand corner is of plain white chiffon edged with a fine French lace. The center of the spread is hand-painted with dainty little pink wild roses and delicate green leaves.

There is a quaint old time charm about a painted fan that is altogether lovely. In this model, the roses and leaves are lightly sprinkled with wee silver spangles sewn on with a fine needle and fine thread. The stitches on the back of the fan are hardly perceptible

The next fan is a dainty affair of white chiffon spangled in gold. A row of the spangles gives a pretty finish on each edge.

Customizing your fan with a stencil

The lower left hand fan has a stencil decoration. This is something decidedly novel and artistic, and is the daintiest affair imaginable. The fan is of white chiffon and the flowers pale yellow with dark green centers and stems a delicate green. The frame of the fan is plain white ivory. To stencil the fan, make the stencil first, then mix the color and try on a side piece of chiffon. Be sure to put the white of an egg in the dye so that the color will not run. Have a separate bristle brush for each color. Half the design is given, so the finished stencil will have two groups of flowers with the stems in toward each other.

Lay the fan on a board with a piece of white blotting paper under the fan. Measure up where each motif will come. Lay the stencil on the fan and fasten all edges down with pins. The color should be lightly dabbed on — not washed on with long strokes. Very delicate handling is necessary. Do not have too much color on the brush. Wipe it on a bit of old white cotton cloth before applying to the chiffon.

The remaining sketch shows a fan of white chiffon which was spangled in silver. Over the spangled fabric are appliqued five handmade point lace butterflies. The edges of the fan are finished with a point lace braid.

One half of the pattern for the butterfly is given. Trace the whole butterfly on a piece of pink cambric. Make the lace over the cambric. The braids that are most effective for the butterflies are No. 155 for the outline of the wings, No. 145 purling to edge the wings, and size 00, crocheted ring, for the upper wings. The body of the butterfly is made of the braid with plain stitches. The stitches should be of the finest texture, using plain cross stitches in the upper wings and a loop of braid in lower. The fan is edged with No. 296 braid.










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