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7 ways to make an old-fashioned Christmas wreath for your front door (1960s)

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6 beautiful ways to make a welcoming Christmas wreath for your front door (1962)

The welcoming Christmas wreath invites all callers to come inside and share the Christmas spirit with you

The traditional symbol of welcome and hospitality is a wreath of fresh greens, trimmed to a fare-thee-well.

To make your own, start with a heavy wire frame 18″ in diameter, and use florists’ twine to attach greens: hemlock, yew, pine, whatever is available, and enough to make a fat, thick wreath.

Then trim it with glittering ornaments, pine cones, perhaps a miniature sleigh, frosted fruits or attic treasures. Finish it off with a satin or velvet bow if you like, hang it on your front door and get ready to welcome your friends.

Dec 16, 1957 Christmas wreath


Vintage holiday decor: Della Robbia old-fashioned Christmas wreath

Artificial fruits, gold and red ribbons, a wood-carved angel

6 beautiful ways to make a welcoming Christmas wreath for your front door - Vintage crafts (1)


Glittering Christmas wreath of tiny ornaments

Ornaments along with frosted fruits and flowers, bits of costume jewelry

6 beautiful ways to make a welcoming Christmas wreath for your front door - Vintage crafts (5)

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Bird’s nest wreath

This vintage Christmas wreath craft is shown complete with two toy birds, has a moss green velvet bow

6 beautiful ways to make a welcoming Christmas wreath for your front door - Vintage crafts (2)


Santa’s sleigh wreath

This cute holiday wreath is trimmed with a berry tree, ribbon bow and streamers

6 beautiful ways to make a welcoming Christmas wreath for your front door - Vintage crafts (3)

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Old-fashioned Christmas wreath with miniature toys

This wreath has a tiny red velvet boot, a candy cane to please the children.

6 beautiful ways to make a welcoming Christmas wreath for your front door - Vintage crafts (4)


How to make an old-fashioned wreath

Here, greens are decorated with a gold eagle, and large and small shining Christmas tree balls.

6 beautiful ways to make a welcoming Christmas wreath for your front door - Vintage crafts (6)


How to make an old-fashioned Christmas wreath with aluminum foil

BELIEVE IT or not, you can quite easily make beautiful, inexpensive Christmas wreaths in your own home!

All you need is a roll of 18-inch heavy-duty aluminum foil, a few common Christmas props, and a tiny bit of your time.

The wreath is made by crushing the foil lightly and shaping it into a circle. When the shape is completed, the wreath comes to brilliant, sparkling life with the addition of ribbons and ornaments. The mirror-like surface of the foil reflects the color touch to create a beautiful and professional-looking holiday decoration.

Decorations can begin simply with ribbon bows, or involve colorful Christmas tree ornaments or lights.

Foil wreaths provide an ideal way to display your Christmas cards. The cards are simply attached on the wreath with straight pins.

Decorate the wreath with candy or cookies, and you have a colorful holiday treat for young visitors,

Foil wreaths can be made small for your windows, or large for your front door.

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Foil christmas wreath from 1960

HERE’S HOW to make the inexpensive basic foil Christmas wreath:

1. Remove a 25-ft. roll of 18-inch heavy-duty aluminum foil from the box, and roll it out in a long streamer on the floor.

Standing at one end of the foil, lift and begin crumpling it — shiny side out — reducing the width to approximately — six inches. As you crumple down the length of the foil, form it into a large circle between 2 and 2-1/2 feet in diameter.

3. As the circle is completed, begin overlapping the foil as you crush it, keeping the shiny side out and forming it over the previous layer of foil until the entire 25-ft. roll is used.

4. While shaping the wreath. be careful to form one surface with the shiny side of the foil facing out, so that the back side of the wreath is the dull side and flattened to go against a wall.

5. To hang the wreath, tie a loop of string around the top and loop over a picture hanger or nail. With large wreaths, also attach loops to the sides and support them with small tacks to prevent the weight of ornaments from causing the round shape to sag gradually over a period of days.

HERE ARE some of the ways a foil wreath craft can be decorated:

Ribbons — Attach one large ribbon bow to the wreath at top or bottom. For added color, add a dozen or more small bows around the wreath, attaching them with straight pins.

Christmas cards — Attach a colorful multi-loop bow to the top of the wreath and place a gold ornament in its center. Christmas cards are. placed around the wreath with straight pins. Make the wreath slightly smaller (approximately 18-20 inches in diameter) and crush tightly for added strength to support many cards.

Ornaments — Attach a large how at the top, then add tree ornaments of one or two colors by hanging from the foil with regular ornament hooks.

Lights — Take a string of Christmas tree lights and push them through the foil from the back of the wreath. They should be spaced evenly around the circle, using the wreath shape to hide the wire. Complete the wreath with a large ribbon bow at top or bottom.

CAUTION: Make certain the string of lights is in good condition. A frayed cord may contact the foil and the wreath become electrified!

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