Drawings & illustrations

Captain Bartho. Roberts with two ships, Viz. the Royal Fortune and Ranger 1721

The Pirate Code: Rules for Black Bart’s ship (1724)

Bartholomew Roberts, also known as Black Bart, was a notorious pirate who raided ships off between 1719 and 1722. Here are some of the harsh - and sometimes unexpected - rules that governed the crews on his ships.
A Phoenix, Arizona birds-eye map view from of the city from 1885

See Phoenix, Arizona in 1885: A birds-eye map of the city

Phoenix, Arizona was first settled in 1867, and here you can see an aerial view of the city as it looked back in 1885, when the population was estimated to be just 3,500, and was said to be 'one of the most beautiful and lovely cities in the West.'

Space age: Amazing retro futuristic homes of the ’60s

What did the future look like from the '60s? In this ad series for Motorola, commercial artist Charles Schridde depicted modernist homes of the future - and perfectly captured the era's sleek style and space-age optimism.

7 budget small house designs (1956)

These seven unique budget small house designs prove that good things still do come in small packages -- that originality can make the tiniest house attractive!
Tesla holding a phosphor-coated wireless light bulb

Nikola Tesla’s plan to give free electricity to everyone (1896)

Free electricity for everyone? It means that if Nikola Tesla succeeds in harnessing the electrical earth currents and putting them to work for man there will be an end to oppressive extortionate monopolies in steam, telephones, telegraphs and the other commercial uses of electricity

Looking back at the history of Chicago (1977)

It is hard to believe that only two centuries ago, Chicago was a lonely marshland of trees and tall grass, a place with an abundance of wild onions, from which the Iroquois gave it its name, Chicagou.

The home of the future: Space-age inventions (1958-1961)

Imagine getting paid to envision the future -- in ways that were inventive, optimistic, fanciful, logical, silly or surreal, depending on the week? Throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s, that is exactly what commercial artist and futurist Arthur Radebaugh got to do.

Pin It on Pinterest